Fallen Goddess, Archons and Gnostic themes in other Myths

I’ve been reading John Lash’s book Not in his Image as of late. It deals with his unique, pagan interpretation of the Nag Hammadi gnostic gospels, and gnosticism in general. Central to gnosticism is the goddess Sophia, meaning wisdom. In recent years the notion of Archons, artificial mind parasites or evil spirits, has acquired some attention in the conspiracy and spirituality circles of the internet.

The Archons were created accidentally by Sophia as she plunges from the Pleroma (the galactic core, spiritual realms, or something) into external (physical?) realms. I’m probably bastardizing and simplifying Lash’s words, since it sounds quite complicated.

In Finnish mythology the creator goddess Luonnotar (from luonto=nature and suffix -tar=-ess female person, such as actor, actress, so she would be Naturess) is described in The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Mythology by Arthur Cotterell and Rachel Storm: In the beginning she was “all alone in a vast emptiness”. She floated in a cosmic ocean until a bird made a nest on her knees and began to hatch eggs. Luonnotar became excited and “upset the nest”, from there were the heavens and the earth formed, and yolk became the sun and white became the moon. The fragments were transformed into the stars.

There is no mention of anything like the Archons here, though, but in certain themes it is similar. The mistake of the creator goddess creates something.

In the Japanese creation myth there’s the god Izanagi and goddess Izanami. The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Mythology says they were ordered to create the islands of Japan. They did this by stirring the sea with a “heavenly jewelled spear” (makes me think of the vajra or a trident). When they drew it out, the droplets became an island. The gods went there and “built a heavenly pillar and a splendid palace”.

The gods noticed differences in their bodies, and Izanagi suggested they bring their different parts together. They circled the heavenly pillar until they met and joined together. The goddess Izanami bore a child, Hiruko (Leech Child 蛭子). He was deformed, because Izanami, the female, had spoken first instead of the male. So they abandoned the child into the sea.

Encyclopaedia Britannica says the two gods “considered him inadequate and set him adrift in a reed boat”. According to Wikipedia, he ended up in Ezo, which is possibly Hokkaido. Somehow Hiruko turned into Ebisu, the god of wealth, the sea and fishing. Ebisu (sometimes written Yebisu) is a fairly commonly used name in products and stuff nowadays. For example there’s beer called Ebisu.

This sounds somewhat more Archontic. First of all, Hiruko was born due to the mistake of a female goddess (leave your gender politics out of this, I would suggest), he is the parasitic leech child and deformed. This is similar to the Archons, I believe. The fact that Ebisu is associated with profit and the sea is quite interesting, since we have Maritime Law which is about the sea, and leeching profit off of the people by shenanigans. Hiruko put into a reed basket and tossed out into the sea reminds me of Moses, of course.

I think there is significant similarity between these myths, although I’m sure what their ultimate meaning is.

 

Links:

Ebisu/Hiruko: http://global.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/266885/Hiruko

Ebisu: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebisu_%28mythology%29

Ebisu: http://www.pantheon.org/articles/e/ebisu.html

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