Tag Archives: myth

NASA claims to have found 7 Exo-Planets: Conjecturing what it actually means

I am doubtful NASA actually engages in any space exploration. Rather I think they are in the entertainment/deception business. They might actually partake in some space exploration, but as most of the information that comes out of them is unreliable, and they’ve been caught lying several times, it is prudent to be skeptical of their claims and intentions. I will explore NASA’s recent claim that they discovered 7 Earth-sized exoplanets in Trappist-1 (star or system?) from this viewpoint.

The star Trappist-1 is, according to The Atlantic website, located about 40 light-years from Earth. It’s size is only slightly bigger than Jupiter. The Atlantic states as follows: “The system resembles Jupiter’s moons Ganymede, Europa, and Io”. I doubt these 7 planets actually exist. I rather think it’s some sort of astrological meme-magic they are trying to feed to us. Let’s take a look at the meaning of some of these names.

Trappist refers to a kind of monk from the Trappist order. The name apparently comes from the abbey of La Trappe in France. Among us regular people the word Trappist is best known from certain types of beers, and I think there’s also Trappist milk in Hong Kong at least. According to Wikipedia, Trappists are contemplative order, they do not take vow of silence but refrain from speaking when not necessary. They follow the rule of St. Benedict. I’m not sure what its significance is, but it might mean something that previous pope, Ratzinger’s, papal name was Benedict.

The Trappist Cisterian order was founded by Armand Jean le Bouthillier de Rancé. I don’t know his significance either. Wikipedia says that he was “originally intended for the Knights of Malta”, but became a monk instead, I suppose. Knights of Malta is a secret society that still exists today. I don’t know if any of is significant in relation to NASA’s alleged discovery, but it might be.

It’s curious that Jupiter is connected to this new star system, as Jupiter is not only another persona of Osiris, a deity supposedly important to modern secret societies, but it also allegedly represents a shift in the secret society structures.

Ganymede was a beautiful man abducted by Zeus (Jupiter) to be his cup-bearer. Wikipedia explains this about him: “The myth was a model for the Greek social custom of paiderastía, the socially acceptable erotic relationship between an adult male and an adolescent male. The Latin form of the name was Catamitus (and also ‘Ganymedes’), from which the English word ‘catamite’ is derived.” A man abducted for his beauty by Zeus and associated with pedophilia.

Io was a mortal woman whom Zeus lusted after, and she became his lover. She was turned a heifer at some point. Interestingly Wikipedia says that the “ancients connected Io with the Moon”, and in Aeschylus’ Prometheus Unbound “she refers to herself as ‘the horned virgin’, both bovine and lunar.” This reminds me of the various Virgin Mary icons with her standing on a crescent moon.

marymoon

 

Europa too was a woman abducted by Zeus. The Rape of Europa is a well-known phrase, and unfortunately a well-known event in recent years.

What do these mythological connections mean then? I naturally don’t know, but I have a few interpretations. Ganymede was a beautiful man whom Zeus (Jupiter) took a liking to and was associated with pederasty, and Io and Europa were women whom Zeus liked. All were mortals. This certainly sounds a bit like Genesis 6:2; “That the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose.” Perhaps Zeus (Jupiter) refers to Nephilim, demons, aliens, or just the occult elite who are going to revel in even more twisted Pizzagate-like debauchery.

Then again, perhaps the connection between Jupiter, Ganymede and Io refers to the trinity of Osiris, Horus and Isis. Zeus took the form of an eagle when he abducted Ganymede, and Horus is a falcon-headed man. Io is associated with the moon and horns as is Isis. Though I’m not sure where Europa fits in with this. I’m also not sure what is the significance of Trappist monks with this. Maybe the word Trappist should be interpreted literally, as in people who make traps. Are the secret society occultists setting some sort of trap?

Many conspiracy researchers claim that the elites worship Saturn. Saturn is the father of Jupiter. Jupiter killed him and became the chief deity. These 7 exoplanets might be Jupiter’s army that heralds the dawn of a new era, Saturn getting replaced with Jupiter. Whether this would make things better or worse, I cannot say.

I don’t know to what all of this refers, but I certainly don’t believe any of NASA’s claims at face value. I find a symbolical or occult explanation for these alleged discoveries a much more reasonable one. NASA comes up with a new discovery or accomplishment every couple of years ago that gets science-geeks excited for a few weeks and then it blows over. People forget, and in the end nothing concrete gets done. Science does not actually advance. No new technologies are developed. Whether it’s the alleged trip to Mars that people are supposedly planning, a new discovery, or even the supposed discovery of the Higgs-Boson God particle a few years ago. I know that wasn’t NASA, but it’s still part of the same scientism-industry. All of this is still just a more sophisticated form of celebrity gossip. It’s there just to distract you, or to somehow psychically manipulate you.

Pedophilia has certainly been in the headlines recently. There was, and hopefully still is Pizzagate, just a few days ago Milo Yiannopoulos was kicked from CPAC for supposed pedophiliac comments, and George Takei seems to be undergoing a similar scandal. Ganymede seems to refer to the same thing, but I’m sure what it all means. I hope it simply means that the crimes of these pederasts will be exposed and they will get judged.

 

Links:

Seven Earth-Sized Planets Have Been Spotted Around a Nearby Star: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/02/seven-exoplanets/517446/

Trappists: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trappists

Armand Jean le Bouthillier de Rancé: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armand_Jean_le_Bouthillier_de_Ranc%C3%A9

Ganymede: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganymede_(mythology)

 

My stuff on Jupiter:

Jupiter Ascending symbolism and messages: https://concordiaabchao.wordpress.com/2015/05/05/jupiter-ascending/

Trump’s Victory suggests a shift in the Power Structure of the Secret Societies: https://concordiaabchao.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/trump-victory-secret-society/

Mimir’s Well and Baphomet’s Wisdom

I’m continuing on the parallel’s between Norse and Judeo-Christian mythology, particularly the stuff related to Baphomet and Cain as Tracy Twyman describes in Clock Shavings. Now that was an exessively long-winded sentence.

There are some striking similarities between Baphomet and Mimir. Wikipedia says that Mimir “is a figure in Norse mythology renowned for his knowledge and wisdom who is beheaded during the Æsir-Vanir War. Afterward, the god Odin carries around Mímir’s head and it recites secret knowledge and counsel to him.” The Knights Templar allegedly had the head of John the Baptist through which Baphomet advised them. Sounds eerily similar to me. John the Baptist was beheaded at the request of the femme fatale, Salome.

Not only was Mimir a provider of secret knowledge, but the Well of Mimir, or Mimisbrunnr, is situated below the world tree Yggdrasil. Apparently the other eye of Odin located in the well, the eye he sacrificed to gain wisdom. The well appears to be a source of “wisdom and intelligence”. Twyman spoke of Baphomet’s Baptism of Wisdom, and that he/she is located in the underworld in or near the abyssal, primordial waters known as Absu or Abzu in ancient Sumeria. I think there is a connection.

Moreover, Tracy Twyman supposedly contacted Jesus using the Ouija board. Jesus told her that the Dohir kings of the pre-diluvian world hid (Noah’s) Ark at a well. As I mentioned in my previous post that the Ark appears be a cube, and referred to as New Jerusalem in the book of revelations. Then there’s the other, black cube in hell, or on the moon. Perhaps the black ark is at Mimisbrunnr. If the moon is somehow connected to the underworld, and it controls the tides and women’s menstruation, this might somehow be connected to the rivers in the underworld, such as in the Greek Hades.

I also think John 4:4-26 from the bible where Jesus meets a Samaritan woman, who has five husbands, at the well is related somehow.

The Norse Edda describes a character named Gylfi who “was the earliest recorded king in Scandinavia (in Sweden).” He used the name Gangleri when he was in disguise. He was apparently tricked by the virgin goddess Gefjon. Gylfi promised her as much land as she could plow in a night, but she used her found giant sons who turned into oxen and plowed lots of land. This caused the Danish island of Sjaelland (Zealand in English, apparently) to detach from the greater land mass. Gylfi was also “a wise man and skilled in magic”.

I’m considering whether Gylfi could be the same as Cain. Note that Twyman claims Cain was a sorcerer-king. Gylfi was the first king in Sweden. Cain was a tiller of the soil, whereas the story does not explicitly mention that Gylfi was, but there is the story with Gefjon, the oxen and plowing related to him. The plowing event lead to movement of landmasses, whereas Cain supposedly caused the biblical flood. Gylfi’s story is not as epic as the flood that destroyed most the world, but still has a similar theme.

One blog, LadyoftheLabyrinth describes Gylfi: “When I first tried to look up the meaning of the name Gylfi, I found only one dictionary dating back to 1886[3] which provided a clue. It literally said that Gylfi refers to a “werewolf”, “shape-changer”, or a “sorcerer who changes into a woman every ninth night”. The other word that composes the title Gylfaginning is ginning, which means “illusion”, “hallucination”, “trick” or “vision”. In my opinion, the most correct interpretation of the title of Snorri`s first book would translate something like “The Vision of the Sorcerer”.” The blog also suggests Gylfi might actually be Odin himself.

So what does this all lead to? Mimir seems rather similar to Baphomet in many ways, but I’m not so sure about the Gylfi/Cain connection. Yet let’s say for the sake of argument they are the same, then it would be quite fascinating how Odin/Gylfi/Cain sacrifices his eye to Mimir/Baphomet for wisdom and receives information from the decapitated head. A friendship made in hell?

BTW, Odin’s horse Sleipnir has eight legs. I wonder is it has a connection to this thing from Rennes-le-Chateau:

 

Links:

Mimir: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%ADmir

Well of Mimir: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%ADmisbrunnr

Brazen Head: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazen_head

Abzu: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abzu

Gylfi: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gylfi

GYLFAGINNING: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/pre/pre04.htm

The Sources to Old Norse Myths: http://freya.theladyofthelabyrinth.com/?page_id=23

 

Soundtrack:

Killing Miranda – Salome: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK0yfezSQPU

Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds – Jesus Met The Woman At The Well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f4pHE4YVfw

Jesus and Buddha are not good Role Models

In modern times, since the end of the Second World War I’d say, this notion of the ideal human being someone like Jesus and Buddha has become quite popular. We’re supposed to be kind, compassionate, loving and pacifistic like them. Jesus is depicted as a loving, non-judgemental hippie who hardly ever acts aggressively, yet things simply go his way because he spiritually rises above petty human concerns. Quite frankly that’s a harmful archetype that has caused a lot of damage in the last few decades.

 

 

I am not criticizing the mythological or historical, whichever way you perceive these characters, account of Jesus or Buddha. They may or may not have had many more varied qualities in the scriptures describing their deeds. I am addressing the archetypal image fairly prevalent in modern times where the ideal person is only about love, compassion and acceptance. All of the nasty stuff simply seems to be deflected off from the aura of benevolence around them. Jesus doesn’t have worry about being mugged in a dark alleyway. Buddha doesn’t need to address how to prevent mass rapes perpetrated by sick criminals. When we are considering such holy notions as love and compassion, these brutal facts simply seem to slip out of our minds.

This mindset is dangerous and harmful, because it basically makes us hate reality as it is. Regardless of whether people are religious, atheist or whatever, many people seem have bought into, as I have in the past, that the ideal we should strive for is this sinless paragon of virtue. We should never be hateful, angry, judgemental or selfish, yet the world sort of forces us to do that sometimes. We have to fight for our place in the world, we have to fight to get what we want or deserve. We understand there are nasty, criminal people in the world, yet we are not equipped to handle it with mere love and compassion. Still we try to reconcile these two mutually exclusive beliefs; the ideal of being meek and non-judgemental, and the unfortunate fact that the world is often unfair and dangerous. This often makes us resent reality for the nastiness inherent in it, when in fact we should resent the childishly idealistic notion of morality. It’s not the world’s fault that it contains a lot nasty and dangerous stuff, in addition to the awesome stuff in it. We can be equipped to deal with if we face it head on in a realistic manner. But if we try to hold onto this inorganic ideology that we should be somehow morally infallible, or even inhuman, we will fail.

Jesus is not a good role model. He is simplistic. He has an everpresent dictator, God, watching over him, conspiring so that things go his way. In this narrative the deck is stacked in his favour. Yours isn’t. So don’t resent the world that it doesn’t allow the archetypal Jesus to exist. He is not real.

The Religious Right is not like this. They’re not all forgiving. They’re quite judgemental on many issues. I may not agree with them on many things, but I’m getting more sympathetic with their overall attitude.

Let’s take a look at other mythological heroes that are better role models.

The 12 labours of Hercules from Greek myth is quite famous. He got shit done, instead of just sitting on his ass being all holy. He killed a shapeshifting lion, and the hydra. Those required both bravery and strength. He was given various tasks to capture a bunch of other animals too. Hercules was forced to clean the Aegean stables with 30 years worth dung in them. He did it by rerouting two rivers to wash the stables. This required intelligence and industriousness. One task was morally questionable, since he has to steal some horses, the Mares of Diomedes. Not part of 12 Labours is the manliest task ever, he impregnated 49 virgins in one night.

Yamato Takeru is apparenly based on a historical person, but has become a part of Japanese mythology. He was a bad ass prince, a son of the emperor, who bravely killed lots of enemies, crushed rebellions and so on. In one quest he was supposed to kill two brothers, so he dressed up as a woman to gain entrance to their palace to kill them. (Possibly the game Final Fantasy VII was inspired by Yamato Takeru, since in one part the main character dresses up as a woman to gain entrance to the palace of a mafia boss.)

Yamato Takeru also killed his brother, either as accident ormaybe he was just an asshole. He also angered a god who cursed him. He got a mystical sword Kusanagi no Tsurugi, which was found in the body of a 8-headed and 8-tailed dragon (sort of like the hydra?), although he didn’t kill it.

Cuchulainn is a Celtic hero who was a tough fighter, romanced many women and killed an enormous hound. Not everything in his life was nice heroic stuff, since he killed his son mistaking him for someone else, and was grief stricken.

Cuchulainn deserves a longer description, as do the Hercules and Yamato Takeru, and I’d like to mention many other mythological heroes here, but quite frankly I’m getting sleepy. I think you get my point nonetheless. These other mythological archetypes are men who did stuff, they affected the world, fought battles, romanced maidens, and also had flaws and did morally dubious or reprehensible things. They’re the kinds of stories that should inspire us. No-one is perfect, we all make mistakes, but despite that we can arise beyond the limitations of our humanity and do something worthwhile. It’s better than aspiring to be a hippie, since they didn’t accomplish much. They didn’t stop the Vietnam war, and the military industrial complex is still going strong today.

And no, I’m not saying you should literally emulate these heroes and go kill people. Don’t be an asshole.

 

Links:

Labours of Hercules: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labours_of_Hercules

49 virgins: http://www.infoplease.com/cig/mythology/training-hero.html

Yamato Takeru: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamato_Takeru

More Takeru: http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~nw6e-mtmr/japan/hero_fiction_e.htm

And more: http://japanesemyth.firespiritdesigns.com/html/yamato.html

8-headed dragon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamata_no_Orochi

Cuchulainn: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C3%BA_Chulainn

Others sources:

The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Mythology by Arhur Cotterell and Rachel Storm

Fallen Goddess, Archons and Gnostic themes in other Myths

I’ve been reading John Lash’s book Not in his Image as of late. It deals with his unique, pagan interpretation of the Nag Hammadi gnostic gospels, and gnosticism in general. Central to gnosticism is the goddess Sophia, meaning wisdom. In recent years the notion of Archons, artificial mind parasites or evil spirits, has acquired some attention in the conspiracy and spirituality circles of the internet.

The Archons were created accidentally by Sophia as she plunges from the Pleroma (the galactic core, spiritual realms, or something) into external (physical?) realms. I’m probably bastardizing and simplifying Lash’s words, since it sounds quite complicated.

In Finnish mythology the creator goddess Luonnotar (from luonto=nature and suffix -tar=-ess female person, such as actor, actress, so she would be Naturess) is described in The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Mythology by Arthur Cotterell and Rachel Storm: In the beginning she was “all alone in a vast emptiness”. She floated in a cosmic ocean until a bird made a nest on her knees and began to hatch eggs. Luonnotar became excited and “upset the nest”, from there were the heavens and the earth formed, and yolk became the sun and white became the moon. The fragments were transformed into the stars.

There is no mention of anything like the Archons here, though, but in certain themes it is similar. The mistake of the creator goddess creates something.

In the Japanese creation myth there’s the god Izanagi and goddess Izanami. The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Mythology says they were ordered to create the islands of Japan. They did this by stirring the sea with a “heavenly jewelled spear” (makes me think of the vajra or a trident). When they drew it out, the droplets became an island. The gods went there and “built a heavenly pillar and a splendid palace”.

The gods noticed differences in their bodies, and Izanagi suggested they bring their different parts together. They circled the heavenly pillar until they met and joined together. The goddess Izanami bore a child, Hiruko (Leech Child 蛭子). He was deformed, because Izanami, the female, had spoken first instead of the male. So they abandoned the child into the sea.

Encyclopaedia Britannica says the two gods “considered him inadequate and set him adrift in a reed boat”. According to Wikipedia, he ended up in Ezo, which is possibly Hokkaido. Somehow Hiruko turned into Ebisu, the god of wealth, the sea and fishing. Ebisu (sometimes written Yebisu) is a fairly commonly used name in products and stuff nowadays. For example there’s beer called Ebisu.

This sounds somewhat more Archontic. First of all, Hiruko was born due to the mistake of a female goddess (leave your gender politics out of this, I would suggest), he is the parasitic leech child and deformed. This is similar to the Archons, I believe. The fact that Ebisu is associated with profit and the sea is quite interesting, since we have Maritime Law which is about the sea, and leeching profit off of the people by shenanigans. Hiruko put into a reed basket and tossed out into the sea reminds me of Moses, of course.

I think there is significant similarity between these myths, although I’m sure what their ultimate meaning is.

 

Links:

Ebisu/Hiruko: http://global.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/266885/Hiruko

Ebisu: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebisu_%28mythology%29

Ebisu: http://www.pantheon.org/articles/e/ebisu.html